Tag Archives: Resource Generation

an affluent activist at occupy wall street says: raise her taxes!

Occupy Wall Street …

Here’s my latest article for The Valley Advocate, about 1%er Jessie Spector, the Program Director at Resource Generation, who was arrested participating in the Occupy Wall Street protests, against her financial interest.

RAISE HER TAXES

Earlier this month, an estimated 700 Occupy Wall Street protesters were arrested while attempting to cross New York’s famed Brooklyn Bridge. It was one of the largest demonstrations to date by the amorphous “Other 99 percent” representing the majority of people who don’t benefit from the socioeconomic privileges enjoyed by the upper 1 percent of wealth holders in the country.

But among the protesters arrested was Northampton native Jessie Spector, who marched that day holding a most unusual sign: “I was born into the 1%, I want redistribution, we’ll all be better for it & Tax me!”

Why would Spector do this?

“I wanted to mix up the message,” she explains. “It’s important to show there are rich people in solidarity.”

Read on … 

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Filed under Accountable Wealth, Activism, American Dream, Class, Economic Justice, Economic Opportunity, Fair Taxation, Social Change

revolt at the waldorf! rich activists push for higher taxes on themselves

Two weeks ago, two affluent activists from Resource Generation joined a rally at New York’s prestigious Waldorf Astoria Hotel to protest Governor Cuomo’s proposed social service cuts combined with tax cuts for the rich. They carried with them a most unusual protest sign: “Another trust-fund baby for taxing the rich.”

Why would they do this? Read about it in my recent article for InTheseTimes.com:

REVOLT AT THE WALDORF:

RICH ACTIVISTS PUSH FOR HIGHER TAXES ON THEMSELVES

A few weeks ago, outside Midtown Manhattan’s famed Waldorf Astoria Hotel, protesters gathered to rally against Governor Andrew Cuomo’s proposal to cut funding for public services, while also cutting taxes for the wealthy. Organized by New Yorkers Against Budget Cuts, the marchers represented several organizations joining together to “Demand That Millionaires Pay Their Fair Share.”

But amidst the chants of “Not another nickel, not another dime! Bailing out millionaires is a crime!” on March 31 were two protesters holding a very unusual rally sign: “Another trust fund baby for taxing the rich! Let’s pay our fair share!”

It certainly wasn’t the first time trust-funders have made their way up Park Avenue to the prestigious Waldorf Astoria. But it was probably the first time inheritors of wealth have publicly rallied in front of the esteemed hotel for an increase in taxes on themselves.

Who would do such a thing? Why would anyone actively advocate against their own self-interest? “Our current tax system perpetuates inequality,” states Elspeth Gilmore. “Wealthy people can really change that narrative.”

Read on …


 

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look out! here comes the progressive tax organizing campaign!

From Wisconsin to Capitol Hill to the National Football League, issues of economic equality are abundant these days.

Seems like everyone is intent on looking out for their own best interest, with little (to no) thought of whether or not their individual gain might be someone else’s loss, let alone how all of it fits together for the benefit, or detriment of our society. But thankfully, there are some folks who, working together, are trying to change that.

Resource Generation and Wealth for the Common Good are two standout organizations that organize and support wealthy folks who want to take a stand, speak out, and change the economic system from which they benefit. And they’ve recently joined forces (“Wonder twin powers activate! Form of …” a more just economy for all!) to create a Progressive Tax Organizing Campaign! Right now (deadline April 1) they are accepting applications from those who wish to become a member of the Progressive Tax Organizing Team, which will be spearheading this exciting, and most needed project. The “group will engage in a collective study on taxes, build storytelling, media and campaign skills, and work together to hone and launch a campaign.”

Want more information? Check out their Progressive Tax Campaign webpage.

Peace, love and tax justice for all …

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Filed under Accountable Wealth, Activism, Class, Economic Justice, Economic Opportunity, Fair Taxation, Social Change

guest post for resource generation blog

A bit ago I attended a Resource Generation gathering in Boston. In attendance were several leaders of the accountable wealth economic justice movement. It was a great opportunity to reflect on all that has already been done in this ever-increasing area of activism, and to imagine what else could be accomplished in the months and years to come.

“In the Shadow of Luminaries” is the guest post I wrote for the Resource Generation Blog on the events of the evening.

IN THE SHADOW OF LUMINARIES

“Hi Pete. I’m Tracy.”

I nearly choke on my absolutely outstanding lemonade as I, in turn, read the nametag of the unassuming party guest in front of me: Tracy Hewat. Tracy Hewat!? The Tracy Hewat?! Founding member of Resource Generation?!

It can be odd, after years spent knowing about someone who has so positively affected your life, to finally meet that person. Like Tracy Hewat. She did not fly in through the doors from the Jamaicaway, super hero cape floating in the breeze. She did not levitate above the floor, body pretzeled in an otherworldly yogi position. She didn’t even get a sports-arena-style welcome, complete with dimmed lights, pumping techno music, and an overly-energetic announcer (“Ladies and gentlemen … put your hands together for … Tracy! … Hew-at!!!!!”) And yet, nonetheless, she somehow managed to accomplish the extraordinary, unprecedented feat of organizing young people of wealth to use their privilege for social change. Some things, I guess, are too big to fit on a Jumbotron.

Read more …

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Filed under Accountable Wealth, Economic Justice, Philanthropy, Social Change